P701 Late-onset Crohn's disease is associated with high risk of intestinal perforation and low risk of perianal fistula as compared with early-onset Crohn's disease: the CONNECT cohort

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Abstract

Background: The late-onset Crohn's disease has several different clinical characteristics from the early-onset Crohn's disease. This study was aimed to compare abdominal and perianal complications between early-onset and late-onset Crohn's disease.

Methods: The Crohn's Disease Clinical Network and Cohort (CONNECT) retrospective cohort was used in this study. Between 1982 and 2010, patients with confirmed Crohn's disease were enrolled. The early-onset Crohn's disease was defined as age at the diagnosis ≥20 and 30< (549 patients), and the late-onset as ≥40 and <70 (185 patients). The multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed with adjustment of sex, smoking, location (L), and behavior (B) or Crohn's disease.

Results: The patients with late-onset Crohn's disease underwent higher rate of abdominal surgery and lower rate of perianal surgery than those with the early-onset Crohn's disease (33.0% vs. 25.0% and 3.8% vs. 22.6%, p<0.0001). The patients with late-onset Crohn's disease had lower rate of perianal fistula than those with the early-onset Crohn's disease (14.8% vs. 41.7%, p<0.0001). In the multivariable analysis, the patients with late-onset Crohn's disease had odds ratio of 3.090 (n=312, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.228–7.772, p=0.017) for intestinal perforation, and odds ratio of 0.122 (n=313, 95% CI: 0.053–0.285, p<0.0001) for perianal fistula.

Conclusions: The late-onset Crohn's disease is associated with high risk of abdominal surgery and intestinal perforation, but low risk of perianal fistula as compared with the early-onset Crohn's disease.

This work was supported by the Research Program funded by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2013-E63004–01)

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