Dietary Micronutrient Intake and Micronutrient Status in Patients With Chronic Stable Heart Failure: An Observational Study

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

Observational studies suggest that patients with heart failure have a tendency to a reduced status of a number of micronutrients and that this may be associated with an adverse prognosis. A small number of studies also suggest that patients with heart failure may have reduced dietary intake of micronutrients, a possible mechanism for reduced status.

Objective:

The aims of this study were to assess dietary micronutrient intake and micronutrient status in a group of patients with heart failure.

Methods:

Dietary intake was assessed in 79 outpatients with chronic stable heart failure with a reduced ejection fraction using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Blood concentrations of a number of micronutrients, including vitamin D, were measured in fasting blood samples, drawn at the time of food frequency questionnaire completion.

Results:

More than 20% of patients reported intakes less than the reference nutrient intake or recommended intake for riboflavin, vitamin D, vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, selenium, and iodine. More than 5% of patients reported intakes less than the lower reference nutrient intake or minimum recommended intake for riboflavin, vitamin D, vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, selenium, and iodine. Vitamin D deficiency (plasma total 25-hydroxy-vitamin D concentration <50 nmol/L) was observed in 75.6% of patients.

Conclusions:

Vitamin D deficiency was common in this group of patients with heart failure. Based on self-reported dietary intake, a substantial number of individuals may not have been consuming enough vitamin D and a modest number of individuals may not have been consuming enough riboflavin, vitamin A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, zinc, copper, selenium, or iodine to meet their dietary needs.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles