VOLATILES PRODUCTION AND ATTRACTIVENESS TO THE MEXICAN FRUIT FLY OF Enterobacter agglomerans ISOLATED FROM APPLE MAGGOT AND MEXICAN FRUIT FLIES

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Abstract

We investigated two strains of uricase (+) Enterobacter agglomerans, one isolated from the apple maggot fly (AMF) and one from the Mexican fruit fly (MFF), for 1) attractiveness to MFF, and 2) production of attractive chemicals. Regarding chemicals demonstrated attractive to the MFF, the MFF bacterial strain produced more 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, 2-phenylethanol, and indole than the AMF strain, whereas the AMF, but not the MFF strain, produced 3-hydroxybutanone. Cell types that predominated in plated subcultures varied from batch to batch resulting in variation in volatiles production, especially by the AMF strain where indole was sometimes a major component of the odor and at other times not detectable. Despite the greater production of attractive chemicals by the MFF strain, the AMF strain was consistently more attractive and the MFF strain was not different from uninoculated control plates. Statistical analyses indicated negative correlations of attractiveness with production of indole, 2,5-dimethylpyrazine, and 2-phenylethanol, and positive correlation with 3-hydroxybutanone. Results support previous findings with the Mexican fruit fly that showed combinations of attractive chemicals sometimes are not attractive.

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