Factor IX Complex for the Treatment of Severe Bleeding After Cardiac Surgery

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Abstract

Background:

Previous reports have been published on the use of recombinant Factor VIIa for intractable bleeding after cardiac surgery; however, there is limited information on the use of Factor IX Complex in this population.

Methods:

A retrospective cohort study of adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery and experienced severe postoperative bleeding, defined as a mean chest tube output ≥300 mL/h. Primary outcomes were changes in chest tube output and blood product usage pre- and post-Factor IX Complex administration.

Results:

Eleven patients received Factor IX Complex for severe postoperative bleeding. The mean dose of Factor IX Complex was 35 (13–52) units/kg. Chest tube output was significantly reduced after Factor IX Complex administration (mean pre-Factor IX Complex 381 ± 49 mL/h, mean post-Factor IX Complex 151 ± 38 mL/h; P = 0.003). Blood product usage decreased after Factor IX Complex but was not statistically significant (mean pre-Factor IX Complex 373 ± 81 mL/h, mean post-Factor IX Complex 212 ± 48 mL/h; P = 0.669). Adverse events included 1 pulmonary embolism (postoperative day 43) and 2 episodes of acute renal failure requiring dialysis (postoperative days 2 and 5).

Conclusions:

In this small group of patients, Factor IX Complex effectively controlled severe bleeding after cardiac surgery preventing the need for re-exploration.

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