Predictive factors for the outcome of high flow nasal cannula therapy in a pediatric intensive care unit: Is the SpO2/FiO2 ratio useful?☆,☆☆,★


    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objectives:To determine the predictive factors for the outcome of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).Materials and methods:We prospectively included all patients with acute respiratory distress/failure aged 1 month to 18 years who were admitted to the PICU between January 2015 and May 2016 and treated with HFNC as a primary support and for postextubation according to our pre-established protocol. HFNC failure was defined as the need for escalation to non-invasive ventilation (NIV) or invasive mechanical ventilation (MV). HFNC responders and nonresponders were compared based on clinical data obtained just before HFNC and at 30, 60, and 120 min, 12, 24, and 48 h, and at the end of therapy.Results:A total of 204 patients (median age: 16.5 months) participated in the study. Twenty-six (12.7%) patients required escalation (4 to NIV and 22 to MV). Age >120 months, higher PRISM-III and respiratory scores, and a lower SpO2/FiO2 (S/F) ratio at admission were predictors of HFNC failure. Achievement of the S/F > 200 goal at 60 min significantly predicted successful HFNC.Conclusion:Monitoring the S/F ratio might be useful and practical to avoid delaying escalation to another ventilation support. Failure to achieve S/F > 200 at 60 min should be a warning for the escalation of respiratory support.HighlightsHFNC seems to be a successful treatment method in children with respiratory distress in PICU.S/F ratio may be used as a predictor for HFNC success just before or on follow up at 60 min of therapy.Monitoring of S/F might be useful and practical in order not to delay escalation to another ventilation support.

    loading  Loading Related Articles