Managing Effect of Hot Spot Shoreline Behind a Power Buoy Energy Farm

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Abstract

LEE, J. L., LEE, J. Y and KIM, I. H., 2011. Managing Effect of Hot Spot Shoreline Behind a Power Buoy Energy Farm. In: Micallef, A. (ed.), MCRR3-2010 Conference Proceedings, Journal of Coastal Research, Special Issue, No. 61, pp. 309-316. Grosseto, Tuscany, Italy, ISSN 0749-0208.

A powerbuoy energy farm is taken into account to generate and deliver green energy to a small town located in Kangwon coast, Korea. The wave heights are reduced on the lee side of a power buoy energy farm. Therefore, ocean energy devices can also protect the coastline from erosion without changing the physical scenes dramatically. Many coastal communities have suffered from the coastal erosion problem. One of the traditional ways to improve the condition has been to build breakwaters, which reflect waves to adjacent areas. The erosion of the unprotected coastlines then gets worse because the energy has to be released in action here and there. Our numerical study involves two modules: 1) wave dynamics analyzed by a plane-wave approximation, and 2) concurrent wave-induced currents. The numerical approaches of the wave-structure interaction have concerned several authors with the direct inclusion of evanescent modes, which require significant CPU time and computational storage. Recently, Lee and Lee (2001) and Lee and Lee (2003) proposed a simple plane wave, wide-spacing approximation method to add scattering terms to the traditional mild-slope equation without inclusion of evanescent modes. Evanescent modes are only considered in analyzing the scattering characteristics for a single buoy.

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