Ossification of Subperiosteal Hematoma: The Potential of Periosteal Osteogenesis in Cranioplasty

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Abstract

Background

Subperiosteal hematoma is the accumulation of blood between the periosteum and the skull, which commonly occurs in the neonatal period but rarely in other ages. Subperiosteal hematoma can be self-absorbed in most cases and occasionally may cause ossification.

Materials and Methods

This study reports a case of subperiosteal hematoma formed in a 16-year-old adolescent boy after a minor trauma. Because the hematoma did not disappear for more than a month after the trauma, the patient was treated with multiple hematoma punctures. However, the hematoma recurred and led to ossification. Finally, the patient underwent surgical treatment.

Results

Finally, the ossification associated with the hematoma was treated through surgery. The head contour recovered normally.

Conclusions

The occurrence of hematoma ossification in the 16-year-old patient suggests that the periosteum has great potential for osteogenesis. This is likely caused by the joint action of some active factors in the blood and a certain tension of the hematoma on the local periosteum. This case provides the following thoughts. (1) A subperiosteal hematoma that has not been absorbed after 1 month should be treated promptly to avoid ossification. Once ossification has occurred, the hematoma should be treated surgically. (2) The potential for periosteal osteogenesis is great, which may provide a new thought for cranioplasty.

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