Aggression in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Supporting the Entire Family

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

CASE: Juanita is a 13-year-old non-verbal Latina girl with autism spectrum disorder, moderate intellectual disability, and a seizure disorder whose aggressive behaviors toward her parents have significantly worsened over the past few months.

Juanita's monolingual Spanish-speaking parents are here today for medication management at her primary care clinic. The parents report that Juanita pinches them, pulls their hair, and hits her head with her fists. Her aggression toward them is usually triggered by feelings of frustrations, leaving her parents feeling like they have to walk on eggshells around her and have led to differing parenting styles. Her father reports that he tries to avoid getting her upset and prefers to watch TV with her, whereas her mother takes on the day-to-day caretaking. Although he wants to take a more active role in parenting Juanita, when he tries, Juanita becomes more aggressive and reacts violently toward him.

During the visit, Juanita keeps her eyes downcast, is withdrawn, and some strain is noted between her parents. While speaking to them, Juanita's mother chimes in and reports that she considers herself the primary caregiver and the one who knows her daughter the best. She often dismisses Juanita's father's reporting, saying that “he doesn't know what really is going on.” When Juanita is taken to the restroom by her mother, her father tearfully reports that he feels that it may be best for everyone that he leaves the family because of Juanita's worsening aggression toward him and the toll it is taking on his marriage. How would you approach her management?

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles