Dietary nucleotides correct plasma and liver microsomal fatty acid alterations in rats with liver cirrhosis induced by oral intake of thioacetamide

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Abstract

Background/Aims:

Dietary nucleotides modulate a number of metabolic processes, including long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effect of dietary nucleotides on plasma and liver microsomal fatty acid profiles in a rat model of liver cirrhosis induced by oral intake of thioacetamide.

Methods:

Fifty-four female Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: rats in the thioacetamide group (n=45) were given 300 mg thioacetamide/l in their drinking water for 4 months, and rats in the control group (n=9) received water during the same period. After 4 months of treatment, 9 rats in each group were killed. The remaining rats in the thioacetamide group were divided into two new groups, and the animals in each were allowed to recover for 1 or 2 weeks on either a nucleotide-free diet or the same diet supplemented with 50 mg of each of the following: AMP, GMP, CMP, IMP and UMP per 100 g diet.

Results:

Saturated (mainly stearic acid), monounsaturated, and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (mainly arachidonic acid), and also the unsaturation index decreased in plasma of rats with experimental cirrhosis. Administration of the diet supplemented with nucleotides to thioacetamide-treated rats corrected plasma levels of saturated, n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and the unsaturation index. In liver microsomes, the cirrhotic rats showed lower levels of protein and higher levels of palmitic, oleic, linoleic and arachidonic acids. Protein concentrations and levels of all the above-mentioned fatty acids were corrected with the nucleotide-enriched diet.

Conclusions:

Dietary nucleotides contribute to correcting plasma and liver microsomal fatty acid alterations in rats with liver cirrhosis induced by chronic oral administration of thioacetamide.

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