Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Reduces Symptoms of Depression in People With a Traumatic Brain Injury: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

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Abstract

Objective:

We sought to determine if we could reduce symptoms of depression in individuals with a traumatic brain injury using mindfulness-based cognitive therapy.

Setting:

The study was conducted in a community setting.

Participants:

We enrolled adults with symptoms of depression after a traumatic brain injury.

Design:

We conducted a randomized controlled trial; participants were randomized to the 10-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy intervention arm or to the wait-list control arm.

Main Measures:

The primary outcome measure was symptoms of depression using the Beck Depression Inventory-II.

Results:

The parallel group analysis revealed a greater reduction in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores for the intervention group (6.63, n = 38,) than the control group (2.13, n = 38, P = .029). A medium effect size was observed (Cohen d = 0.56). The improvement in Beck Depression Inventory-II scores was maintained at the 3-month follow-up.

Conclusion:

These results are consistent with those of other researchers that use mindfulness-based cognitive therapy to reduce symptoms of depression and suggest that further work to replicate these findings and improve upon the efficacy of the intervention is warranted.

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