Eligibility to treatment and economic effect of the implementation of the new US or European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology hypertension guidelines

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the population and economic impact of implementing the new Joint National Committee (JNC) or European Society of Hypertension (ESH)/European Society of Cardiology (ESC) hypertension guidelines in the Swiss population.

Methods:

Cross-sectional, population-based sample (6708 participants) collected between 2003 and 2006 in the city of Lausanne, Switzerland. Blood pressure categories were defined according to both the JNC (JNC-7 and JNC-8) and the ESH/ESC (2007 and 2013) guidelines.

Results:

The proportion of participants aged 35–60 years eligible for drug treatment was 25.6% [95% confidence interval (CI) 24.4–26.9%] and 24.8% (95% CI 23.6–26.0%) for the JNC-7 and the JNC-8 guidelines, respectively; for participants aged 60–75 years, the values were 62.3% (95% CI 60.1–64.5%) and 46.8% (95% CI 44.5–49.0%), respectively. Shifting from the JNC-7 to the JNC-8 guidelines would lead to an annual saving of 163.6 million Swiss francs (187.7 million US dollars or 134.5 million European €). The proportion of participants aged 35–75 years without chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus or reported history of cardiovascular disease and eligible for treatment was 30.2% (95% CI 29.0–31.4%) for the ESH/ESC 2007 and 2013 guidelines. For participants with chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus or reported history of cardiovascular disease, the values were 73.6% (95% CI 70.8–76.3%) and 55.6% (95% CI 52.5–58.8%), respectively. Shifting from the ESH/ESC 2007 to the ESH/ESC 2013 guidelines would lead to an annual saving of 86.9 million Swiss francs (99.5 million US dollars or 71.4 million European €).

Conclusion:

In Switzerland, shifting from the JNC-7 to the JNC-8 guidelines or from the ESH/ESC 2007 to the ESH/ESC 2013 guidelines would decrease the prevalence of patients eligible for treatment and increase the percentage of treated patients within blood pressure goals. Both strategies lead to potential savings in antihypertensive drug treatment.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles