Oscillometric analysis compared with cardiac magnetic resonance for the assessment of aortic pulse wave velocity in patients with myocardial infarction

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objectives:

Measurement of aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) is the gold standard for assessment of aortic stiffness. In patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), high aortic PWV has deleterious effects on the myocardium. In the present study, we compared a novel oscillometric device with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging for the assessment of aortic PWV in STEMI patients.

Methods:

We measured aortic PWV in 60 reperfused STEMI patients using two different methods. The oscillometric method (PWVOSC) is based on mathematical transformation of brachial pressure waveforms, oscillometrically determined using a common cuff (Mobil-O-Graph, I.E.M., Stolberg, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany). Phase-contrast CMR imaging (1.5 T scanner, Siemens, Erlangen, Bavaria, Germany) at the level of the ascending and abdominal aorta was performed to determine CMR-derived pulse wave velocity with the use of the transit time method.

Results:

The mean age of the study population was 57 ± 11 years; 11 (18%) were women. Median PWVOSC was 7.4 m/s (interquartile range 6.8–8.9 m/s), and median CMR-derived pulse wave velocity was 6.3 m/s (interquartile range 5.7–8.2 m/s) (P < 0.001). A strong correlation was detected between both methods (r = 0.724, P < 0.001). Bland–Altman analysis revealed a bias of 0.62 m/s (upper and lower limit of agreement: 3.84 and −2.61 m/s). The coefficient of variation between both methods was 21%.

Conclusion:

In reperfused STEMI patients, aortic PWV assessed noninvasively by transformation of brachial pressure waveforms showed an acceptable agreement with the CMR-derived transit time method.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles