MPS 03-06 POOR RELIABILITY OF WRIST BLOOD PRESSURE SELF-MEASUREMENT AT HOME. A POPULATION-BASED STUDY

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Abstract

Objective:

The reliability of blood pressure measurement with wrist devices, which has not previously been assessed under real-life circumstances in general population, is dependent on correct positioning of the wrist device at heart level. We determined if an error was present when blood pressure was self-measured at the wrist in 721 unselected subjects from the general population.

Design and Method:

After training, blood pressure was measured in the office and self-measured at home with an upper-arm device (the UA-767 Plus) and a wrist device (the UB-542, not provided with a position sensor). The upper-arm - wrist blood pressure difference detected in the office was used as the reference measurement.

Results:

The discrepancy between office and home differences was the home measurement error. In the office systolic blood pressure was 2.5% lower at wrist than at arm (p = 0.002), while at home systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher at wrist than at arm (+5.6% and +5.4%, respectively, p < 0.0001 for both); 621 subjects had home measurement error of at least ± 5 mmHg, and 455 of at least ± 10 mmHg (bad measurers). In multivariable linear regression, a lower cognitive pattern independently determined both the systolic and diastolic home measurement error and a longer forearm the systolic error only. This was confirmed by logistic regression having bad measurers as dependent variable.

Conclusions:

The use of wrist devices for home self-measurement therefore leads to frequent detection of falsely elevated blood pressure values likely due to a poor memory and rendition of the instructions, leading to the wrong position of the wrist.

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