MPS 06-08 THE AVAILABILITY OF RESOURCES FOR STANDARD MANAGEMENT OF HYPERTENSION AT PUBLIC PRIMARY HEALTH CARE FACILITIES SHARGELNEEL LOCALITY-KHARTOUM STATE-SUDAN

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Abstract

Objective:

To study the availability of resources needed for standard management of hypertension in Public Primary Health Care Facilities, aiming to generate information for establishing quality control program.

Design and Method:

Facility- based cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Sharg-Alneel locality, Khartoum State. The study covered 29 public primary health care facilities and 3 rural hospitals. The study population composed of all health care providers in the public health facilities available during the study period. They were 119 care providers of various categories including physicians, consultants, general practitioners and others. A standardized administered questionnaire and a standard checklist were developed, pre-test and used for data collection. The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS) version 15.

Results:

Marked shortage of health care providers (physicians and nurses) was encountered; only 0.5-physician per10, 000 populations and 0.6 nurse per10, 000 populations. 71.4% of the physician and 93.5% of other health care providers were not subjected to training on standard management of hypertension. Standard referral, reporting and recording systems, were not yet established in all health facilities. Hypertension information, education and communications materials and national guidelines were not available in all health facilities. Sphygmomanometers were available in 96.6% of the facilities, adult weighing scale was available in 93.1% of the facilities, ophthalmoscope was available in 24.2% of the facilities, x-ray machine was available in 20.7%, ECG machine was available in 17.2%. Essential investigations e.g. reagent for cholesterol was available in 20.7%, creatinine kits available in 31%, blood urea were available in 62.1%, and reagent for uric acid testing was available in 37.9% of the facilities respectively. Only three out of 14 anti-hypertensive drugs were available, and these were; Aspirin (86%), Furosemide (62%) and Atenolol (50%).

Conclusions:

There was a marked shortage in health care providers, other resources were inadequate for quality services for hypertension.

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