PS 05-67 GENDER DIFFERENCE IN THE CHANGE OF AUGMENTATION INDEX AFTER TREADMILL EXERCISE

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

Although augmentation index (AIx), which measures the arterial stiffness, has been shown to be greater in women than men, height may influence AIx, and women is usually shorter than men. This study aimed to investigate the gender difference of AIx before and after treadmill exercise.

Design and Method:

Forty-six subjects (22 women and 24 men), who underwent treadmill exercise test for the evaluation of chest pain, were enrolled in this study. The waveform of central aortic pressure was recorded before and after treadmill exercise using SphygmoCor®, and pulse rate-adjusted AIx (AIx@75) was measured.

Results:

Age (W; 52.6 ± 16.1 vs. M; 51.8 ± 14.8 years), prevalence of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes or hyperlipidemia, and medications were not different, but height was shorter in women (156.5 ± 6.3 vs. 168.4 ± 7.0 cm, p < 0.001). Baseline AIx@75 was greater in women (25.7 ± 13.0 vs. 18.0 ± 11.1%, p = 0.036). Total duration of exercise and maximal MET's during treadmill test were not different. After exercise, AIx@75 was also greater in women (29.5 ± 10.7 vs. 19.2 ± 7.9%, p = 0.001), but changes of AIx@75 were not different between genders (W; 3.7 ± 9.5 vs. M; 1.2 ± 8.5%). AIx@75 was significantly correlated with height (baseline; r = −0.540, p < 0.001, after exercise; r = −0.550, p < 0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis including height, AIx@75 at baseline or after exercise was not significantly different between genders.

Conclusions:

Gender difference of AIx before and after treadmill exercise was not observed. Height was the major determining factor of AIx.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles