PS 05-74 THE ASSOCIATION OF CENTRAL BLOOD PRESSURE HEMODYNAMICS AND CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE IN ANGINA PATIENTS

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Abstract

Objective:

Recent studies using pulse wave analysis suggest that central blood pressure is different from brachial blood pressure. Since central blood pressure directly reflects left ventricular overload, it is more effective in predicting left ventricular remodeling and cardiovascular disease.

Objective:

Aortic stiffness and augmentation index are also revealed as an important predictor of cardiovascular risk in several clinical studies. We examined the correlation of above central hemodynamics with coronary artery disease.

Design and Method:

We evaluated consecutive 56 angina patients with preserved LV systolic function who underwent non-emergent coronary angiography for the evaluation of angina pectoris. All patients were measured total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, and highly sensitive C-reactive protein. Brachial blood pressure was measured twice. Central blood pressure, waveform and radial augmentation index were measured using radial pulse tonometry (HEM 9000AI-Omron). Aortic distensibility was calculated using systolic and diastolic aortic diameters are shown on the M-mode tracing obtained at a level 3 cm above the aortic annulus using transthoracic echocardiography (Acuson®). Patients were classified into two groups according to the angiographic findings: normal or insignificant (lumen narrowing < 50%) coronary artery disease (group A) versus significant coronary artery disease (group B).

Results:

The mean age of group A was 61 ± 10, the percentage of male was 43%, those of group B were 61 ± 8 and 60% respectively.

Results:

There were no significant differences in gender, age, or other cardiovascular risk factors between two groups. Aortic distensibility (1.62 ± 1.4 vs 2.33 ± 1.9·10–3mmHg−1, p = 0.2), central systolic blood pressure (130 ± 19 vs 125 ± 22, p = 0.3) and radial augmentation index (81 ± 15 vs 76 ± 18, p = 0.29) also did not showing significant differences.

Conclusions:

We were unable to find the definite relationship between central hemodynamic parameters such as central systolic blood pressure and aortic distensibility with coronary artery disease. Small sample size, single center and retrospective design could be limitation of this study.

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