PS 05-82 THE LONGITUDINAL EFFECT OF VARIABILITY OF BLOOD PRESSURE ON ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY: RESULTS FROM THE KAILUAN COHORT STUDY

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Abstract

Objective:

It now remains to be a controversial issue whether blood pressure variability (BPV) increases the risk of all cause mortality. The current study aims to determine the association between BPV and all-cause mortality in a Chinese longitudinal study.

Design and Method:

53,725 participants were enrolled in the cohort study and have been followed-up for a media of 5.05 years. The Standard Deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) of BP, as well as per SD increase in SD of BP were used to present the BPV. Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine the effect of BPV on the increased risk for all-cause mortality.

Results:

The highest quartiles of SD and CV of BP are associated with all-cause mortality (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.20–1.66 & 1.34, 95%CI, 1.15–1.52), as well as DBP (HR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.00–1.36 & HR, 1.19, 95%CI, 1.02–1.38). The HR for SD of SBP and mean heart rate is the biggest in the highest quartiles of both SD of SBP and mean heart rate (HR: 2.63, 95%CI, 1.98–3.50). The results of CV of SBP and mean heart rate are consistent with SD of SBP. The BPV has bigger effect on all-cause mortality in people with lower mean SBP (HR = 1.12, 1.16.1.08) and those with diabetes mellitus (HR = 1.13 VS 1.11).

Conclusions:

BPV is an independent predictor of all-cause mortality risk, even after adjusted for mean SBP and DBP. BPV of the population with higher mean heart rate, lower mean SBP or diabetes is associated with greater mortality risk.

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