PS 06-13 TELEMONITORED HOME BLOOD PRESSURE MEASUREMENT TO ASSESS THE TRUE PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION IN SINGAPORE

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Abstract

Objective:

Published prevalence rates of hypertension in Singapore are based on office blood pressure measurements. Many patients referred to specialist hypertension services are normotensive on further evaluation. Juronghealth conducts regular population health screenings which include blood pressure (BP) measurements. This study aims at assessing how many of these are truly hypertensive.

Design and Method:

In ongoing population health screenings, BP is measured on registration. Patients with two consecutive measurements between 140/90- 180/110 mmHg are offered participation in our study. They receive a Bluetooth enabled BP monitor and instructions on how and when to record their BP at home. Seven day averages are calculated, and diagnosis of hypertension is based on these values. Patients receive written health advice based on the telemonitored BP and their basic risk factors. They are further offered a complementary visit to a primary care provider who is aware of the telemonitored assessment.

Results:

Since October 2015, 816 residents attended the health screening. 94 (11.5%) had elevated BP values at registration; 27 participated in our study. Of these, 10 (37%) were normotensive. One patient with repeated BP measurements exceeding 180 mmHg was identified by telemonitoring and urgently referred to primary care services, where her BP was controlled before the end of the telemonitoring period.

Conclusions:

Prevalence of hypertension at registration is significantly lower than the published rates among the participants of the community health screenings in Western Singapore. When diagnosis of hypertension is based on telemonitored home measurements, the prevalence drops by a further 37%. The data presented in this abstract are preliminary but show a clear and internally consistent trend towards lower BP measurements in the resident population. We conclude that previously published data may not reflect true prevalence rates of hypertension in Singapore.

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