PS 11-16 POSTPRANDIAL HYPOTENSION, IS IT REAL?: THE PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF A PILOT STUDY

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Abstract

Objective:

Postprandial hypotension is an important hemodynamic abnormality, but it is very under-recognized. We performed this pilot study to evaluate the prevalence of postprandial hypotension and the possible associations between postprandial blood pressure (BP) decline and other forms of BP variability in type 2 diabetes.

Design and Method:

We enrolled 21 patients with type 2 diabetes. All patients were examined with ambulatory BP monitoring and we recorded every meal time. Postprandial hypotension was defined as a systolic BP fall of at least 20 mmHg compared with baseline BP level.

Results:

Mean age was 64.4 ± 11.8 years and 11 patients were female (52.4%). Overall systolic BP and diastolic BP are 127.4 ± 13.2 mmHg and 73.4 ± 9.8 mmHg. Overall systolic BP variability was 13.7 ± 5.5. Average postprandial BP fall was 13.9 ± 10.7 mmHg and the BP fall was most conspicuous after breakfast. Fourteen patients (67%) were experienced postprandial hypotension by definition. Among them, 6 patients (43%) were non-dipper, 5 patients (36%) were reverse dipper and a patient was extreme dipper. Average systolic BP variability was significantly higher in the patients with postprandial hypotension (15.1 ± 6.2 vs. 10.9 ± 1.9, P = 0.02).

Conclusions:

Postprandial hypotension is common in type 2 diabetes and there is possible relationship between postprandial hypotension and other abnormal BP patterns. To clarify the clinical significance of postprandial hypotension, large sized long term prospective study is needed.

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