PS 11-23 IMPACT OF ADMISSION BLOOD PRESSURE AND HISTORY OF HYPERTENSION ON CLINICAL OUTCOMES OF PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

Hypertension (HTN) has been considered a strong risk factor of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, growing evidence suggests that low blood pressure (BP) plays a role against adequate myocardial perfusion in AMI. We aimed to investigate how admission BP status impact on clinical outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in Korean acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients.

Design and Method:

Between November 2011 and December 2014 a total of 12,432 consecutive AMI patients were enrolled in Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. They were divided into four groups according to admission BP status [Group I (n = 970): patients with normal BP and without HTN history, Group II (n = 1,957): patients with normal BP and with HTN history, Group III (n = 1,494): patients with high BP and with HTN history, Group IV (n = 531): patients with high BP and without HTN history]. Primary endpoint was composite of major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at one year.

Results:

Kaplan-Meier analysis showed lowest incidence of MACE in Group IV (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Group III also showed better results than Group I or II (p < 0.0001). However, Group I and II showed similar results, which showed highest incidence of MACE. Moreover, survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model revealed that patients in Group IV turned out to be one of the independent factors for prediction of MACE-free survival (HR 0.867, 95% CI 0.773–0.972, p = 0.015) even after adjusting clinically relevant multiple variables.

Conclusions:

Non-hypertensive AMI patients presenting with high admission BP showed most favorable clinical outcomes among groups at one year after PCI.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles