PS 11-58 CLINICAL CORRELATES OF INFLAMMATION IN HYPERTENSIVE AND NORMOTENSIVE PATIENTS WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY

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Abstract

Objective:

Patients with abdominal obesity are at increased cardiovascular risk. However, it is evident that this clinical group is heterogeneous. The aim of the study was to assess clinical correlates of C-reactive protein level in hypertensive and normotensive patients with abdominal obesity.

Design and Method:

We investigated 55 middle-aged adults with abdominal obesity including 34 hypertensive and 21 normotensive subjects. Abdominal obesity was defined according to IDF definition (2009). In addition to routine clinical investigation we measured serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and insulin. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was calculated with Cockroft-Gault formula. Spearmen's correlation coefficient (rs) was used to assess the correlations between the clinical and laboratory parameters in each group.

Results:

Elevated serum level of C-reactive protein was found in 4 out of 34 hypertensive and in 1 out of 21 normotensive patients with abdominal obesity (11.8% vs. 4.8% respectively). In both groups this parameter had no significant correlations with age, body mass index, serum levels of urea, creatinine, LDL, HDL, triglycerides and left ventricular mass index. In hypertensive patients serum level of C-reactive protein correlated with serum insulin (rs = 0.422, p = 0.016), HOMA-IR index (rs = 0.439, p = 0.013), total cholesterol level (rs = 0.395, p = 0.023) and estimated GFR (rs = 0.344, p = 0.048). In normotensive patients it correlated with waist-to-hip ratio (rs = 0.511, p = 0.036) but not with serum insulin (p = 0.185), HOMA-IR index (p = 0.128), total cholesterol level (p = 0.642) or GFR (p = 0.566).

Conclusions:

The results of the study suggest that hypertensive and normotensive patients with abdominal obesity are characterized by different clinical correlates of C-reactive protein level. Further studies are needed to elucidate clinical implications of these findings.

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