PS 15-12 JOB STRAIN IS RELATED TO CHANGES OF ORTHOSTATIC BLOOD PRESSURE AMONG NEWLY GRADUATED NURSES

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Abstract

Objective:

In this study, we investigated the association of job strain with orthostatic blood pressure changes and heart rate variabilities among newly graduated nurses.

Design and Method:

A total of 53 subjects selected from the participants in the newly graduated nurse cohort study. They underwent a survey for the simple standing-up test, brachial blood pressure (every minute), R-R intervals of electrocardiogram (ECG, continuously). The basic attributes and lifestyle habits (housing, meals, sleep, etc.) were asked by using a self-administered questionnaire. To assess job stress, Children Orthostatic Dysregulation Diagnosis and Treatment Guidelines 2005 (Japanese version), The Impact of Event Scale – Revised (IES-R), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale were used. Comparison examination was carried out between first month and 7 months after start working as a nurse.

Results:

Systolic blood pressure (111.4 ± 10.2 vs. 108.1 ± 9.8 mmHg), eating out (1.8 ± 0.9 vs. 1.5 ± 0.8 count/week) and sleep time (6.7 ± 0.8 vs. 6.5 ± 0.8 hour) were significantly higher at 7 months compared to those at the first month. Number of participants with orthostatic dysregulation positive was also increased along with longer work durations. Psychological stress scales was higher at the 7 months than those at the first month, but the differences were not significant. There were no significant differences of autonomic nervous function in both group.

Conclusions:

These results suggest that psychological stress may affect orthostatic dysregulation, and orthostatic blood pressure variabilities.

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