PS 15-19 FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CONTROLLED HYPERTENSION BY SEX: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and for hypertensive patients to avoid complications and increase their quality of life its control is important. Factors affecting hypertension control might be not limited to the individual. In this study we review existing studies of factors related to hypertension control and evaluate these on four levels: individual, work/family, community, and social. As the impact of factors may also differ between males and females, the effects of various factors on hypertension control were analyzed according to sex.

Design and Method:

Four databases (Pubmed, Web of Science, DBpia, and Korean studies information service system) were searched. All studies investigating the factors related to hypertension control were included.

Results:

Thirty studies met the inclusion criteria, and the factors associated with hypertension control varied across the four levels from individual to social. Whether the effect of these factors on hypertension control was positive or negative was controversial. In the only six studies including sex-specific analysis, health status, smoking, cardiovascular disease, and duration of hypertension was significant only in men. Factors significant only for women included marital status, exercise, alcohol, waist circumference, and health insurance.

Conclusions:

Factors associated with hypertension control were distributed not only on an individual level but also on macro levels such as community and social. To improve hypertension control, such factors should be considered across all levels. Moreover, factors associated with hypertension control may differ between men and women. Further studies are necessary to develop gender-specific, multidimensional interventions for hypertension control.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles