PS 17-24 CAN EXERCISE-BASED CARDIAC REHABILITATION IMPROVE FUNCTIONAL CAPACITY IN ADULTS WITH HYPERTENSION-RELATED CORONARY HEART DISEASE? A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

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Abstract

Objective:

To systematically review relevant literatures to determine if exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves functional capacity in adults with hypertension-related coronary heart disease.

Design and method:

Six randomised control trials (RCT) with a total of 5877 participants met the inclusion criteria. 1952 of the total participants are known hypertensives on single pill therapies of ACE inhibitors, diuretics and beta-blockers. Ages of participants ranged between 18–80years. General quality of included studies were below average and not all was double blinded. A predefined criteria following Cochrane collaboration laid-down systematic review pattern was used to select studies and a comparative narrative analysis pattern was employed in analysis of findings.

Results:

There is increased interest to participate in all-encompassing cardiac rehabilitation programs as well as sustained ability to perform exercise therapies. All studies showed increase in functional capacity following cardiac rehabilitation.

Conclusions:

Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation improves functionl capacity in adults with Coronary Heart Disease associated with hypertension. Reduction in cardiac morbidity and mortality is attributed to positive efftects of exercise of coronary risk factors (blood pressure, total cholesterol and triglycerides). Ultimately, cardiac rehabilitation promotes recovery, return to full physical function and reduces further risk of cardaic events thereby maintaing wellbeing and quality of life.

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