PS 17-35 CARDIAC AND RENAL INVOLVEMENT IN MALIGNANT-ACCELERATED HYPERTENSION: IMPLICATIONS ON LONG-TERM SURVIVAL.

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Abstract

Objective:

We aimed to evaluate the severity of cardiac and renal involvement and their respective implications on long-term survival of patients with malignant hypertension.

Design and method:

We performed a single-center retrospective analysis of 176 patients with malignant hypertension, diagnosed in the period 1984–2014.

Results:

Incidence of malignant hypertension decreased along the different periods of the study, but cardiac and renal damage at presentation were common and severe. In 94.6% we observed left ventricle hypertrophy on echocardiogram, in 83.2% the glomerular filtration rate was below 60 ml/min/1.73 m2 and 11% of patients required immediate dialysis. The survival rate was 95% at 6 months, 90% at 12 months, 81% at 36 months, and 67% at 5-year follow-up. In a Cox-regression analysis, the independent predictors of all-cause mortality were age, SBP at discharge, septum wall thickness values and GFR at admission.

Conclusions:

Malignant hypertension remains a severe complication of arterial hypertension with a high mortality rate at 5-year, that was independently associated to the severe cardiac and renal involvement present in most patients.

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