PS 17-59 SUBCLINICAL TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS AT A TEACHING HOSPITAL IN EASTERN NEPAL

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Abstract

Objective:

The objective of the study was to find the occurrence of left ventricular hypertrophy and renal insufficiency among hypertensive patients at BPKIHS- teaching hospital.

Design and method:

A hospital based cross-sectional study was carried out for one year (Aug 2014-Aug 2015) at General OPD of BPKIHS- teaching hospital. A total of 255 hypertensive patients (male = 56%, female = 44%) were interviewed with a standardized questionnaires that included socio-demographic characteristics and clinical data of study participants. Subclinical target organ damage (SOD) was assessed by physical examination, ECG, and estimation of glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance. Data was analyzed by statistical software SPSS 10.5 version. Chi-square test was applied to see the association between various related variables and outcome in bivariate analysis.

Results:

Among study participants, 52 (20.4%) patients had at least one of the two subclinical target organ damage studied (left ventricular hypertrophy and renal insufficiency). The organ most affected was the heart presenting as left ventricular hypertrophy observed in 48 (18.8%) followed by renal insufficiency in 35 (13.7%) patients. The duration of hypertension, smoking habit, uncontrolled blood pressure, irregular use of antihypertensive medications and obesity were positively related to the occurrence of SODs.

Conclusions:

This study showed a lower (20.4%) but significant occurrence of SOD among hypertensive patients attending General outpatient clinic at BPKIHS-Teaching Hospital. Left ventricular hypertrophy detected by ECG was the most prevalent SOD (18.8%) followed by renal insufficiency (13.7%) calculated by CKD-EPI formula. It may also be inferred from the findings of this study that effective blood pressure control is associated with lower occurrence of SODs in hypertensive patients. These findings highlight the significance of regular screening for subclinical target organ damage among hypertensive patients who present to General outpatient department.

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