PS 17-74 DIETARY HABIT OF SALTY FOODS AND ACTUAL SALT INTAKE IN OUTPATIENTS WITH NON-COMMUNICABLE DISEASE

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Abstract

Objective:

High salt intake increases not only blood pressure (BP), but also risk for cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, identifying individuals with actual salt intake is important for prevention and management of hypertension. Aim of this study was to examine the relationship between consciousness of restriction of salty diet and actual salt intake in outpatients with non-communicable disease.

Design and method:

The salt intake was estimated using Tanaka's formula. The patients were asked about consciousness of salt restriction on a self-reported questionnaire.

Results:

The values of age, male gender, office BP, body mass index (BMI) and estimated salt intake were 61.3 ± 14.9 year, 52.8 %, 127 ± 16 / 74 ± 11 mmHg, 25.5 ± 4.2 kg/m2 and 8.7 ± 2.5 g/day, respectively. The estimated salt intake was positively correlated with systolic BP and BMI. Based on the questionnaires, the patients were divided into salt-conscious patients who were careful to reduce their daily salty food intake, and non-salt-conscious patients. The salt intake was lower in the salt-conscious group than in the non-salt-conscious group. There was significant relationship between consciousness of salt intake and actual salt intake. Although clinical correlates such as obesity, age and gender may affect the relationship, consciousness of salt restriction may affect as a favorable factor for actual salt intake in the outpatients.

Conclusions:

We conclude that he importance of monitoring and evaluation of consciousness of salt intake as a means of encouraging the behavior modification for salt restriction. Further studies are needed to confirm the relationship.

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