PS 17-87 TARGET ORGAN DAMAGE IN SURVIVORS OF THE SIEGE OF LENINGRAD.

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Abstract

Objective:

Intrauterine starvation and growth retardation could promote to development of cardiometabolic disorders in the adult life. The aim of our study was to assess which period of famine is the most significant for cardiovascular damage in survivors of the siege of Leningrad.

Design and method:

305 survivors of Leningrad Siege were examined. All people were divided in three groups: 1- childhood famine group (211 people), who were born before January 1, 1941, 2- the new-born/infant group (50), who were born from January 1 to October 31, 1941 and 3-intrauterine famine group (44 people), born from 1 November 1941 to 27 January 1943. All participants were interviewed by special questionnaire regarding lifestyle, socioeconomic risk factors, cardiovascular disease, comorbidities and medication. Blood pressure was measured twice on right arm in the sitting position after 5 minute of rest. Anthropometries were performed according to standard procedures. Creatinine and urine albumin to creatinine ratio were measured on Abbot. Echocardiography (Vivid 7) was performed. Carotid ultrasonography, used for assessing intima-media thickness (IMT) was performed. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was assessed by the SphygmoCor (Atcor, Australia). CAVI and ABI were performed on Vasera (Fukuda, Japan). Informed consent was obtained from all participants.

Results:

Results are presented in Table.

Conclusions:

Exposure to famine during intrauterine period leads to higher prevalence of hypertension. Subjects who were born before the Leningrad siege more often had higher prevalence of cardio-renal damage possible due to older age.

Conclusions:

Abstract Type: Poster Abstract Submission No.: PP-2321

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