LBPS 02-34 CLINICAL OBSERVATION OF BLOOD PRESSURE RHYTHM IN CHILDREN

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Abstract

Objective:

To investigate the dynamic blood pressure rhythm in 24 hours in children with essential hypertension, and to provide guidance for the prevention and treatment of target organ damage in clinic.

Design and Method:

Seventy-four children who were diagnosed as essential hypertension and admitted to Capital Institute of Pediatrics from January 2007 to March 2014 were enrolled. All children accepted 24 hours ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, with the Complete data recorded. According to the different blood pressure stages (prehypertension, issue 1 hypertension and issue 2 hypertension) of 74 children, the blood pressure rhythm and the circadian rhythm of blood pressure in different stages were observed and compared with that of normal children.

Results:

The average age was (12.2 ±2.7) years old, with 58 boys (78.4%) and 16 girls (21.6%), There were 9 children (12.2%) with prehypertension, 43 children (58.1%) with issue 1 hypertension and 22 (29.7%) with issue 2 hypertension. In 74 cases, the average systolic pressure was (133.59 ± 11.95) mmHg, and average diastolic pressure was (75.68 ± 9.57) mmHg. In prehypertension, the average systolic pressure was (122.93 ± 10.31) mmHg, and the average diastolic pressure was (70.13 ± 5.84) mmHg. In issue 1 hypertension, the average systolic pressure was (130.16 ± 8.68) mmHg and the average diastolic pressure was (72.24 ± 6.32) mmHg. In issue 2 hypertension, the average systolic pressure was (144.65 ± 10.97) mmHg and the average diastolic pressure was (84.44 ± 11.05) mmHg. By analyzing the dynamic blood pressure of 74 children, the results showed that dipper blood pressure rhythm of the patients with essential hypertension was absent.

Conclusions:

There was no normal circadian rhythm of blood pressure in children with issue 1 and issue 2 hypertension. Increased blood pressure may result in target organ damage because of long-term stress state of heart, brain, kidney and other organs.

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