LBPS 02-62 COMPARISON OF INTERFERENCE OF HYPERTENSION AND SLEEP DISORDERS AMONG NORMAL ADULT POPULATION AND REFUGEES

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Abstract

Objective:

A recent studies found that insomnia was strongly associated with impaired quality of life and poor physical and mental health, depression and increased morbidity and mortality in population-based studies. Indeed, insomnia has not clearly been shown to be causally associated with hypertension The aim of this study is to identify, how the insomnia is correlated with hypertension by comparison of normal population and refugees.

Design and Method:

The 250 patients (mean age 56 ± 8.5 years) from each group of normal population (I group) and refuges (II group) were investigated for presence of insomnia. Criteria DSM-IV was used for establishment of Primary Insomnia (PI), which was applied after the following symptoms occurrence for at least 1 month: the sleep disturbance, clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning, which did not occur exclusively during the course of any underlying organic or mental disorder or as effect of drug abuse. All patients underwent blood pressure monitoring and evaluated by Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scale.

Results:

From I group the PI was found in 8.5%, hypertension-24% (p > 0.005). There was not any significant correlation among them. The II group revealed the strong correlation between the hypertension (48%) and PI (54%), (p < 0.005). In both groups PI and hypertension strongly correlated with depression-anxiety disorders (p < 0.005).

Conclusions:

Chronic stress among refuges followed by PI and neuropsychological disorders may cause hypertension, but not the primary insomnia per se. There is a need of future investigations to establish this relationship.

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