[PP.16.26] WORKING IN SHIFTS INFLUENCES THE ONSET OF HYPERTENSION, IN THE WORK AND LIFESTYLES IN NURSING PROFESSIONALS

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

Identify the association between working in shifts and work, lifestyle and arterial pressure, in nursing professionals.

Design and method:

Cross-sectional study with 231 professionals (147 nursing aids/technicians, 84 nurses, 39.6 ± 8.3 years, 82.7% women) randomly selected in an oncology hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. An interview was performed for the sociodemographic and work characteristics and the evaluation of lifestyles. A casual blood pressure measurement was done with an automatic device, validated and 24 h Outpatient Blood Pressure Monitoring (OBPM) during the professionals’ work.

Results:

It was found that 59.7% worked in shifts, 25.5% had a history of arterial hypertension, 29.8% reported ingestion of alcoholic beverages, 7.4% were smokers, 65.4% were sedentary, 69.7% were overweight/obesity and 70.1% altered waist circumference. The prevalence of hypertension were: a) 35.1% by casual blood pressure measurement; b) 26.0% in the OBPM during the awake period; c) 30.0% in the 24 h OBPM; d) 40.4% in the OBPM during sleep. In relation to the blood pressure dip during sleep we found: a) systolic pressure - absent in 13.9% and attenuated in 40.3%; b) diastolic pressure - absent in 10.8% and attenuated in 29.4%, of professionals. There was a difference (p < 0.05) among the professionals who worked and those not worked in shifts, respectively, in relation to the following variables: a) professional category (nursing auxiliary/technician-55,8% vs Nurse-44,2%); b) work in the night shift (41.3% vs 37.7%); c) graduation time [15.4 (SD = 7.9) vs 17.6 (SD = 7.6) years]; d) weekly working hours [(54.2 (SD = 17.0) vs 48.7 (SD = 12.4)]; and) working time in hospital [7.9 (SD = 7.2) vs 9.6 (SD = 7,8) years]; f) intake of alcohol (37% vs 19.4%); (g) have some type of leisure activities (75.4% vs 61.3%); and h) hypertension in the OBPM during the sleep period (45.9% vs 31.8%).

Conclusions:

Working in shifts influenced in the occurrence of hypertension in the sleep period in the work and lifestyles characteristics. Therefore, the adoption of strategies that modify these variables can be useful in the prevention of cardiovascular outcomes in the nursing professionals who work in shifts.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles