[PP.19.12] EASTERN EUROPEAN HYPERTENSIVE IMMIGRANTS ARE CHARACTERIZED BY POOR HEALTH-RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE IN COMPARISON TO NATIVE HYPERTENSIVES

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Abstract

Objective:

Much of the variance in hypertension-related sequelae across ethnic groups, is highly related to deficits in accurate health-related data. We sought to evaluate the burden of migration on health-related quality of life (H-rQoL) in the setting of essential hypertension (EH). We hypothesised that immigrants would indicate lower scores in the most dimensions of H-rQoL than natives, reflecting differences in social-economic status.

Design and method:

We studied 67 Eastern European immigrants with newly diagnosed untreated stage I-II EH (aged 51 ± 15 years, 35 male, office blood pressure (OBP) = 159/92 mmHg), who immigrated to Greece within the previous two years and 61 hypertensives natives matched for age, gender and OBP. The validated Greek version of the Short Form 36 (SF-36) General Health Survey questionnaire was administered to all participants. The subscales were further grouped into two summary scales: the physical component summary (PCS) and the mental component summary (MCS). Non parametric Mann-Whitney tests were performed.

Results:

Hypertensive immigrants scored significantly lower in all dimensions of SF-36 when compared to natives.

Conclusions:

In conclusion, immigration process and resettlement experience jeopardizes H-rQoL in the setting of EH. It is crucial for primary health care units and other social services to conduct screening programmes for hypertension and its impact to the psychological well-being of the migrating people

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