[PP.20.14] ABNORMAL VALUES OF ANKLE-BRACHIAL INDEX ARE ASSOCIATED TO A GREATER PREVALENCE OF LEFT VENTRICULAR HYPERTROPHY AND OTHER RELEVANT ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC FINDINGS IN DIABETIC HYPERTENSIVES

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Objective:

To evaluate the correlation between ankle brachial index (ABI) and cardiac abnormalities evidenced by echocardiogram in hypertensive patients with diabetes.

Design and method:

We evaluated the prevalence of echocardiographic findings according to ABI values in 99 hypertensive diabetic patients. The patients were classified in normal ABI group (ABI <= 0.9 or ABI>1.4) and abnormal ABI group (>=1.4 or ABI>0.9). From the data obtained by echocardiogram we analyzed a composite endpoint that included cardiac morphological and functional changes relevant to clinical practice (left ventricle hypertrophy, ventricular dysfunction, etc).

Results:

The mean age was 65.4 ± 7 years (50–80 years) and 61.6% were women. There is no difference concerning age, gender, race, body mass index, and metabolic profile between normal ABI group (49 patients) and abnormal ABI group (50 patients). It was observed higher levels of systolic blood pressure (mmHg) and albuminuria (value) and greater prevalence of GFR < 60 ml/min/m2 (%) among patients with abnormal ABI. The echocardiographic composite endpoint was more prevalent abnormal ABI group (84.0% versus 59.2%, p = 0.006). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed abnormal ABI as an independent predictor for the occurrence of echocardiographic composite endpoint (OR = 3.43; 95%CI = 1.07–11.0; p = 0.04) as well as for the presence of left ventricle hypertrophy (OR = 4.35, 95%CI 1.42–13.52, p = 0.011).

Conclusions:

Hypertensive diabetic patients with abnormal ABI values has a higher prevalence of left ventricle hypertrophy and other relevant clinical echocardiographic findings. Thus, measurement of ABI could identify patients with hypertension and diabetes at higher risk for cardiac abnormalities.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles