[PP.29.13] LEFT VENTRICLE HYPERTROPHY AND DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ABDOMINAL OBESITY IN HYPERTENSIVE WOMEN

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Abstract

Objective:

Observational studies have demonstrated that increased abdominal circumference is an important marker of high cardiovascular risk. The purpose of this study was to identify structural and functional cardiac changes in non-diabetic hypertensive women with abdominal obesity (AO).

Design and method:

Cross-sectional study with 120 hypertensive women, aged 40–65 years, were divided into two groups: without (AO-, n = 42) and with (AO+, n = 78) abdominal obesity according to abdominal circumference < or > = 88 cm, respectively. After clinical evaluation, all the patients carried out biochemical tests, echocardiography, and carotid ultrasound.

Results:

The mean age was 53 years in both groups. The diastolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the group AO+ (90 ± 1 vs 85 ± 1 mmHg, p < 0.05). On the other hand, the systolic blood pressure, although higher among women AO+, did not reach statistical significance (145 ± 2 vs 140 ± 2 mmHg, p = 0.098). The group AO+ presented greater number of criteria (3.1 ± 0.1 vs 1.4 ± 0.1, p < 0.001) and greater prevalence (62.8 vs 11.9%, p < 0.001) of metabolic syndrome. Despite normal and similar serum glucose levels in both groups, patients AO+ presented HOMA-IR (2.62 ± 0.22 vs 1.61 ± 0.17, p < 0.01) and HOMA-beta (358 ± 57 vs 200 ± 22, p < 0.05) significantly higher than in patients AO-. In echocardiography, the systolic function was comparable between the two groups, but the patients AO+ presented evidences of diastolic dysfunction by tissue Doppler and a higher prevalence of left ventricle hypertrophy (29.2 vs 2.4%). There was no difference in carotid intima-media thickness between the two groups.

Conclusions:

In this sample of middle-age non-diabetic hypertensive women, abdominal obesity was associated with left ventricle hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction with no evidence of atherosclerotic process.

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