[PP.34.06] SEVERE SNORES WITHOUT APNEA AND UNDERESTIMATED HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE

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Abstract

Objective:

Snoring is the main manifestation of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS)

Objective:

Hypertension (HPB) occurring in this subject is more likely to be associated with alterations in day to night BP changes.

Objective:

It described an association between snoring and HBP, but it is known that an important quantity of the snorers does not present apnea.

Objective:

To evaluate ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) pattern day to night BP changes and

Objective:

their correlation with snoring scale in hypertensive patients without apnea.

Design and method:

92 male HP were prospectively included (age 52 +− 20 BMI 31+− 5 systolic and diastolic BP 168 +− 23 and 101 +− 8 respectively).

Design and method:

Exclusion criteria: OSAS, antihypertensive or anxiolytic therapy; respiratory pathologies and smoke or alcohol abuse.

Design and method:

All patients were evaluated by Berlin questionnaires and they were classified according to a scale of snoring in mild, moderate or severe. All patients underwent ambulatory BP measurement (Space Labs 90207) and polisomnographic studies (PSG).

Design and method:

Pattern dipper was considered a fall > 10% in medium nocturnal BP (NBP) vs medium diurnal BP (DBP) and inverse dipper NBP > than DBP.

Design and method:

Statistical analysis were performed by Kruskal Wallis test, chi squared distribution and Spearman correlation.

Design and method:

P < 0,05 was considered statistically significant.

Results:

ABP pattern showed that 58 HP (63%) had lost the Circadian Rhythm, and 29 HP, out of these 58 HP, disclosed an inverse dipper pattern. Moreover, we found a significant diference in 28 severe snoring patients (30.4%) between nocturnal diastolic BP (NDBP) and office diastolic (ODBP) (P 0.03).

Results:

A significant correlation was found between severe snoring and nocturnal systolic and diastolic BP (p 0.01) as well as 24 hour systolic BP (p 0.03). This correlation stays unaltered even when adjusted by age and BMI. Office BP had no correlation with severe snoring.

Conclusions:

A high incidence of day to night BP changes and a significative underestimated high NDBP were found in our snoring HT patients without apnea.

Conclusions:

We found a significative relationship between severe snoring and ABP,

Conclusions:

According to our results, nocturnal blood pressure should be evaluated in non apneic severe snoring hypertension population.

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