[PP.LB03.11] CAN ARTERIAL STIFFNESS PREDICT LARGE ARTERY DAMAGE IN SHORT TERM IN PATIENTS ON DIALYSIS?

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Abstract

Objective:

To study a short term aortic pulse wave velocity measurement value for predicting cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis.

Design and method:

26 stable dialysis patients (mean age 57.27 ± 13.97) without previous large artery damage were prospectively studied. Blood tests within 6 month were accomplished. All patients underwent two carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity measurements at the beginning of the study and after 6 months. Carotid-femoral PWV assessment was performed on the non dialysis day. We collected data about cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events during 6 month follow-up and according this divided patients into two groups (with and without events). Statistical analysis was performed using R Statistical Software.

Results:

During a 6 month follow-up, 2 non cardiovascular deaths, 7 cardiovascular events (atrial fibrillation, myocardial infarction) and 1 cerebrovascular (stroke) event were registered. Cerebrovascular and cardiovascular pathology was associated with an increase in beta2-microglobulin concentration (46.91 vs 33.51, 46.91, p = 0.0626) and in carotid-femoral PWV at the beginning of the study (11.4 vs 10.9, p = 0.6707) and during follow-up (12.55 vs 10.00, p = 0.0369). There was no difference between groups while comparing other laboratory parameters (albumin, cholesterol, parathyroid hormone concentration, CRP, hemoglobin concentration, calcium and phosphate level) and no correlation between carotid-femoral PWV and beta2-microglobulin values. Patients with carotid-femoral PWV >10 m/s had 2,6 higher event risk.

Conclusions:

Carotid-femoral PWV even in a short term follow-up helps indicate patients with higher cerebrovascular and cardiovascular risk.

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