A8800 Single versus multiple 24-hour urine collections for estimation of long-term potassium intake and the associated cardiovascular risk

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Abstract

Objectives:

High potassium (K+) intake decreases blood pressure (BP) while high sodium (Na+) intake increases BP. Na+ and K+ intake are usually estimated with a single 24-hour urine collection. However, recent data show that a single 24 h urine sample is inaccurate for estimation of long-term Na+ intake. We investigated whether long-term K+ intake can be estimated with a single 24 h urine sample, and whether urine Na+/K+ ratio may be a more stable parameter.

Methods:

We selected adult subjects with an eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73m2 who had an outpatient 24 h urine sample between 1998–1999. We estimated urine K+ excretion and Na+/K+ ratio at baseline and during 1/5/15-year follow-up. We used Cox regression analysis to assess the association between K+ excretion and Na+/K+ ratio, and cardiovascular (CV) events or mortality, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or mortality.

Results:

We selected adult subjects with an eGFR > 60 mL/min/1.73m2 who had an outpatient 24 h urine sample between 1998–1999. We estimated urine K+ excretion and Na+/K+ ratio at baseline and during 1/5/15-year follow-up. We used Cox regression analysis to assess the association between K+ excretion and Na+/K+ ratio, and cardiovascular (CV) events or mortality, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or mortality.

Conclusion:

A single 24 h urine collection is insufficient for estimation of long-term K+ intake or urine Na+/K+ ratio and the associated CV risk.

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