Impact of acute kidney injury in elderly (≥80 years) patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention

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Abstract

Objectives

This study sought to investigate the prevalence and impact of acute kidney injury (AKI) in elderly patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).

Background

AKI may complicate PCI and has been associated with worse outcomes. Data on AKI following PCI in elderly patients are scarce.

Methods

A total of 458 elderly (≥80 years) patients undergoing PCI at Charité—University Medicine Berlin between January 2009 and December 2014 were stratified according to the presence/absence of AKI. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality. The secondary endpoint was rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), a composite of all-cause mortality, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, and rehospitalization for heart failure. Median follow-up was 280 (interquartile range 22–1190) days.

Results

Of the 458 patients, 125 (27.3%) developed AKI following PCI. Age >90 years, congestive heart failure, and C-reactive protein at presentation emerged as independent predictors of AKI. All-cause mortality was 20.0% and 8.4% in patients with and without AKI (P = 0.001), and corresponding rates of MACE were 39.2% and 26.4% (P = 0.01), respectively. The occurrence of AKI was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (adjusted HR 2.41, 95%CI 1.12–5.17, P = 0.02) and MACE (adjusted HR 1.75, 95%CI 1.15–2.67, P = 0.01).

Conclusions

AKI occurs in a third of elderly (≥80 years) patients undergoing PCI and is associated with increased mortality. These findings underline the unmet clinical need to identify novel strategies for the prevention of AKI in this high-risk patient subset.

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