The Effect of Exercise on Lipid Profiles and Inflammatory Markers in Lean Male Adolescents: A Prospective Interventional Study


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Abstract

BackgroundPhysical activity improves body composition and inflammatory markers in obese individuals, but little is known about the nonobese population.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate associations between exercise and inflammatory cytokines in lean male adolescents in Taiwan.MethodsThis interventional study enrolled a total of 79 normal body weight male adolescents [mean age, 16.8 (1.0) years] from the Army Academy of Taiwan. Body composition and inflammatory markers were measured at baseline and upon completion of a 12-week exercise intervention program.ResultsSubjects’ postintervention anthropometric measures, including waist circumference [74.6 (5.2) → 72.6 (5.2) cm], hip circumference [92.3 (4.1) → 89.9 (5.0) cm], body fat mass [10.2 (3.2) → 8.2 (3.2) kg], and body fat percentage [15.8% (4.2) → 12.6 (4.5)%] declined significantly compared to preintervention (all P < 0.001), as did systolic blood pressure (P = 0.002) and mean blood pressure (P = 0.020). Postintervention body height and free fat mass increased significantly (both P < 0.001). Subjects’ postintervention lipids including total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides increased significantly (all P < 0.001). Inflammatory markers including adiponectin [14.32 (6.68) → 31.31 (30.53) μg/mL, P < 0.001], interleukin 6 [2.15 (4.81) → 2.86 (6.37) pg/mL, P = 0.005], and C-reactive protein [1.00 (2.57) → 2.30 (4.17) μg/mL, P < 0.001] increased significantly postintervention, but not leptin.ConclusionsExercise training significantly improves body composition and anti-inflammatory adiponectin levels in lean male adolescents.

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