Effect of 20 days' bed rest on the reverse cholesterol transport system in healthy young subjects

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Abstract

Objectives.

To study the effects of 20 days of bed rest on HDL cholesterol, lipoprotein lipase, hepatic triglyceride lipase, cholesterol ester transfer protein and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase.

Design.

A 20-day intervention study.

Setting.

Makita general hospital.

Subjects.

Five male and five female healthy participants, mean age 20.4 years, range 19-24 years.

Interventions.

Twenty days of bed rest.

Main outcome measures.

Lipid, lipoprotein, lipoprotein lipase, hepatic triglyceride lipase, cholesterol ester transfer protein and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase.

Results.

Fasting HDL, HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol levels decreased from 1.748 to 1.404 mmol L−1 (P < 0.01), from 0.807 to 0.628 mmol L−1 (P < 0.01) and from 0.939 to 0.784 mmol L−1 (P < 0.05), respectively, while VLDL triglyceride levels increased from 0.365 to 0.754 mmol L−1 (P < 0.05). Plasma post-heparin lipoprotein lipase activity decreased from 0.494 to 0.418 μmol mL−1 h−1 (P < 0.01), but plasma post-heparin hepatic triglyceride lipase activity and cholesterol ester transfer protein activity did not change during bed rest. Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase activity increased from 72.5 to 84.8 nmol mL−1 h−1 (P < 0.001).

Conclusions.

Twenty days of bed rest induced a decline in HDL cholesterol levels and an increase in VLDL triglyceride levels. When considering lipoprotein lipase, hepatic triglyceride lipase, cholesterol ester transfer protein and lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase as factors in the decreased HDL cholesterol, the contribution of lipoprotein lipase is suggested.

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