The Upper Limit of Cerebral Blood Flow Autoregulation in Acute Intracranial Hypertension

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Summary

The present series of experiments was performed to investigate the influence of acute intracranial hypertension on the upper limit (UL) of cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation. Three groups of eight rats each—one with normal intracranial pressure (ICP) (2 mmHg), one with ICP = 30 mmHg, and one with ICP = 50 mmHg— were investigated. Intracranial hypertension was maintained by continuous infusion of lactated Ringer's solution into the cisterna magna, where the pressure was used as ICP. Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), calculated as mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) - ICP, was increased stepwise by continuous intravenous infusion of norepinephrine. CBF was calculated by the intracarotid 133Xe method. In all three groups the corresponding CBF/CPP curve included a plateau where CBF was independent of changes in CPP, showing intact autoregulation. At normal ICP the UL was found at a CPP of 141 ± 2 mmHg, at ICP = 30 mmHg the UL was 103 ± 5 mmHg, and at ICP = 50 mmHg the UL was found at 88 ± 7 mmHg. This shift of the UL was more pronounced than the shift of the lower limit (LL) of the CBF autoregulation found previously. We conclude that intracranial hypertension is followed by both a shift toward lower CPP values and a narrowing of the autoregulated interval between the LL and the UL.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles