Effects of the Sensory Stimulation Program on Recovery in Unconscious Patients With Traumatic Brain Injury

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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Unconscious patients after brain injury may survive for days or months and often experience decreased quality of life. To facilitate the recovery process and to prevent sensory deprivation after brain injury, sensory stimulation program (SSP) beginning in the early stages of recovery can be beneficial. This quasi-experimental study examined the effect of an SSP on recovery in unconscious patients after traumatic brain injury. Unconscious patients were divided into control and experimental groups. SSP was directed to five sensory modalities including tactile, gustatory, olfactory, auditory, and visual. Response to stimulation was assessed using the modified Sensory Modality Assessment and Rehabilitation Technique score and the Glasgow Coma Scale score. SSP was initiated 6.65 ± 2.35 days after injury in the control group and 6.8 ± 2.48 days for the experimental group. The results showed that mean modified Sensory Modality Assessment and Rehabilitation Technique scores after commencing the SSP in the experimental group were significantly higher than those in the control group (14.76 ± 2.33 vs. 8.72 ± 1.52, respectively, p < .05). Mean Glasgow Coma Scale scores after commencing the SSP in the experimental group were significantly higher than those in the control group (10.45 ± 1.82 vs. 5.9 ± 1.77, respectively, p < .05). The results indicated that the SSP can enhance brain recovery in traumatic brain-injured patients.

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