Patient and Caregiver Perspectives of Preoperative Teaching for Deep Brain Stimulation Surgery

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Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has developed into an important therapy for Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia with more nurses in varied settings often preparing patients and families for this type of surgery. This exploratory study sought to obtain patient and caregiver perspectives of the current DBS teaching for Parkinson disease, essential tremor, and dystonia; to improve the teaching; and to standardize the education. Using survey methodology, 41 patients with movement disorder and 32 caregivers completed surveys about the preoperative instructions they received. Data analysis calculated frequencies for response rate, demographic information, multiple-choice questions, and Likert scale responses. Fill-in questions were summarized. Results overall showed that, because of the teaching, two thirds of patients and nearly two thirds of caregivers felt fully prepared for the DBS surgery. Patients’ and caregivers’ suggested recommendations for nurses and surgeons included requests for specific information such as attention to delivery of the education, more individualized care during the education, attention to pain during and after procedure, and postdischarge follow-up. The study identified unmet patient and caregiver needs, resulted in changes in practice, and serves as a guide toward standardization of educational approach and/or content.

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