Social Anxiety and Benign and Toxic Online Self-Disclosures: An Investigation Into the Role of Rejection Sensitivity, Self-Regulation, and Internet Addiction in College Students

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

This work aimed to explore the relationship between social anxiety with benign and toxic online self-disclosures with the mediating role of rejection sensitivity, self-regulation, and Internet addiction. In this study, 358 students who were active members of social networks at the Mohaghegh Ardabili University, Iran were evaluated in the form of a structural equation model. The results substantiated that social anxiety could explain 47% of the variance in benign online self-disclosure and 27% of toxic online self-disclosure with the mediating role of rejection sensitivity, self-regulation, and Internet addiction. It was found that people with high social anxiety had higher rejection sensitivity and lower self-regulation. Also, people with higher social anxiety had directly higher benign and toxic online self-disclosures. The results indicated that self-regulation did not have a direct impact on benign online self-disclosure; however, it had a direct negative impact on toxic online self-disclosure.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles