Identification of new risk factors for wound separation in gynecologic malignancy surgery

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Abstract

Aim:

The purpose of this study was to compare prophylactic subcutaneous drainage plus subcuticular sutures versus staples for the risk of wound separation after skin closure following gynecologic malignancy surgery, and to investigate the risk factors of this procedure.

Material and Methods:

Patients were divided into two groups: 120 patients who were treated with subcutaneous drainage plus subcuticular sutures (Suture group) and 201 patients with staples plus subcutaneous sutures (Staples group). In the Suture group, subcuticular tissue was approximated with interrupted 4–0 polydioxanone sutures, and adhesive closure strips were used on the skin surface. A 3.3-mm closed drainage was implicated in subcutaneous tissue. In the Staples group, subcutaneous tissue was approximated with interrupted polyglactin (Vicryl, Ethicon) sutures.

Results:

Baseline characteristics were not significantly different between the two groups. Mean operation times were compatible (201 vs 196 min, P = 0.16). The incidence of wound separation was less in the Suture group than in the Staples group (3/120 vs 17/201, P = 0.033). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the Staples group was an independent risk factor for wound separation (odds ratio 7.34, 95% confidence interval: 1.59–33.91, P = 0.011), independent of obesity, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages, and operation time. None of the 14 obese patients in the Suture group showed surgical wound separation.

Conclusions:

The combination of a prophylactic subcutaneous drain and subcuticular sutures reduced wound separation after skin closure following gynecologic malignancy surgery. With the information regarding risk factors established in this study, the above method provides the best results to minimize the risk, particularly in obese patients.

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