Maternal rare inherited bleeding disorders and neonatal complications

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Abstract

Aim:

The aim of this study was to examine the association between maternal inherited bleeding disorders and neonatal complications.

Material and Methods:

This was a historical cohort study. The rare inherited bleeding disorders (RIBD) group consisted of a total of 100 women suffering from inherited bleeding disorders, aged 20–45 years who experienced pregnancy. In the healthy control group, 200 age- and body mass index-matched women were selected. Details of demographic and obstetric characteristics of the samples in both groups were collected using their medical records.

Results:

The mean ages of the women in the RIBD and healthy control groups were 32.6 (7.07) and 32.4 (7.3) years, respectively. No statistically significant differences were found in terms of age and other demographic characteristics of the women between the groups. The mean neonatal birthweight in the RIBD group was statistically lower than that in the healthy control group, 3018.2 (546.9) g vs 3299.4 (456.8) g, respectively (P = 0.021). The prevalence of low birthweight in the RIBD group was statistically higher in comparison to that in the healthy control group (P = 0.041).

Results:

After adjustment for potential confounders, it was found that maternal bleeding disorder had significant negative effects on birthweight in newborns (odds ratio, 1.05; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.43, P = 0.001). Those infants were statistically more likely to experience head bleeding, early hyperbilirubinemia and hospitalization than the healthy group (P = 0.001).

Conclusions:

Maternal rare inherited bleeding disorders may have a devastating consequence for neonates.

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