Risk factors for complex regional pain syndrome in patients with surgically treated traumatic injuries attending hand therapy

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Abstract

Study Design:

Prospective cohort study.

Introduction:

Identification of risk factors for CRPS development in patients with surgically treated traumatic injuries attending hand therapy allows to watch at-risk patients more closely for early diagnosis and to take precautionary measures as required.

Purpose of the Study:

The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for the development of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) after surgical treatment of traumatic hand injuries.

Methods:

In this prospective cohort, 291 patients with traumatic hand injuries were evaluated 3 days after surgery and monitored for 3 months for the development of CRPS. The factors assessed for the development of CRPS were age, sex, manual work, postoperative pain within 3 days measured on a Pain Numerical Rating Scale (0–10), and injury type (crush injury, blunt trauma, and cut laceration injury).

Results:

CRPS was diagnosed in 68 patients (26.2 %) with a duration of 40.10 ± 17.01 days between the surgery and CRPS diagnosis. The mean postoperative pain score was greater in patients with CRPS than in those without CRPS (P < .001). Patients with pain scores ≥ 5 had a high risk of developing CRPS compared with patients with pain scores <5 (odds ratio: 3.61, confidence interval = 1.94–6.70). Patients with crush injuries were more likely to develop CRPS (odds ratio: 4.74, confidence interval = 2.29–9.80).

Conclusions:

The patients with a pain score of ≥5 in the first 3 days after surgery and the patients with crush injury were at high risk for CRPS development after surgical treatment of traumatic hand injuries.

Level of Evidence:

II b.

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