Periodontitis and Plasma C-Reactive Protein During Pregnancy

    loading  Checking for direct PDF access through Ovid

Abstract

Background:

Periodontitis has been associated with increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in non-pregnant adults. We examined the relationship between periodontitis and CRP among women who provided dental radiographs and had blood collected during early pregnancy, excluding smokers and diabetic patients.

Methods:

From Project Viva, an ongoing cohort study, we measured plasma CRP in 35 subjects with periodontitis (i.e., at least one site with ≥3 mm of alveolar bone loss) and a random sample of 66 periodontally healthy subjects matched on age and race/ethnicity. We performed linear regression analysis with log-transformed CRP levels as the outcome.

Results:

The mean (± SE) CRP level was 65% higher (95% confidence interval: 2%, 180% P= 0.06) in women with periodontitis (2.46 - 0.52mg/l) than in controls (1.49 ± 0.22mg/l), adjusting for factors related to CRP levels, including age, race/ ethnicity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, alcohol intake, education, income, and gestational age at blood collection.

Conclusions:

These findings suggest that periodontitis may increase CRP levels in pregnancy. CRP could potentially mediate the association of periodontitis with adverse pregnancy outcomes. J Periodontol 2006;77:821-825.

Related Topics

    loading  Loading Related Articles