Factors Affecting Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Surgical Patients

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Abstract

Purpose:

This study was to identify factors affecting postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and to investigate the incidence of PONV for the first 24 hours after operation.

Design:

The prospective research was performed in an 1,100-bed university hospital, from April to December, 2011. The sample consisted of 609 patients with elective surgery.

Methods:

Factors affecting PONV were identified by multiple logistic regression.

Findings:

Incidence of PONV was 27.1% for the first postoperative 24 hours. Insertion of nasogastric tube (OR, 4.54, P = .002), history of PONV (OR, 3.24, P < .001), general anesthesia (OR, 2.76, P = .002), history of motion sickness (OR, 2.33, P < .001), and female sex (OR, 2.05, P = .004) were high risk factors of PONV. The nonadministration of antiemetics during operation (OR, 1.70, P = .014) and nonuse of intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (OR, 1.54, P = .038) increased PONV during the first postoperative 24 hours.

Conclusions:

Patients of female gender, history of motion sickness and PONV, general anesthesia, and nasogastric insertion are more likely to experience PONV.

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