Survival of cast-metal, resin-bonded fixed partial dental prostheses after nearly 20-year follow-up: A retrospective study


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Abstract

Statement of problem.Cast-metal resin-bonded fixed partial dental prostheses (RBFPDPs) are a conservative approach to replacing missing teeth. Despite their recognized advantages, the use of cast-metal RBFPDPs as a definitive option remains somewhat controversial because of the lack of long-term studies on their success.Purpose.The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the long-term survival rate of cast-metal RBFPDPs and investigate the influence of covariates such as sex, type of prosthesis, location, number of pontics, abutments, and type of luting cement on the survival of bonded prostheses.Material and methods.This study evaluated 209 cast-metal RBFPDPs cemented in 181 patients (mean 41.06 ±11.90 years of age) treated in the principal author’s private practice between July 1993 and May 2012. Data sheets were completed at the patients’ recall examination at regular intervals or if seen for complications. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to evaluate the survival rate of the prostheses before debonding. The Cox model and Wald test were used to analyze the prognostic factors (α=.05).Results.A total of 198 prostheses were studied. Eleven cast-metal RBFPDPs were lost to follow-up. This study evaluated the effect of different variables on the survival rate of both conventional RBFPDPs (wing-wing) and combination resin-bonded FPDPs (wing-crown) types. Survival rate was divided into “with repair” and “without repair” groups. The mean survival time was 102.24 months for the group with no repair and 119.76 months for the group with repair. The survival rate after 5, 10, and 15 years was 86%, 42%, and 15% with repair, whereas 69%, 32%, and 14% of the prostheses survived without repair.Conclusions.In appropriate clinical conditions and selected patients, cast-metal RBFPDPs were a viable treatment option with an acceptable survival rate.

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